Collector Alert! There’s only two weeks left in my museum show and sale, Honoring the Weavers with Canvas and Bronze

If you want to see these artworks around the landscapes and people that inspired them, you need to act fast

I cannot believe it was just less than a year ago that my friend, painter James Ayers, and I began our research of traditional Navajo weaving culture at the historic Toadlena Trading Post as part of our endeavors as founders of the Wopila Artist Guild.

And now, the show is nearing it’s end on August 12, 2011.

 

James Ayers (left) and I at the entrance of our museum show at the historic Toadlena Trading Post

James Ayers (left) and I at the entrance of our museum show at the historic Toadlena Trading Post

About Honoring Weavers with Canvas and Bronze at theThe historic Toadlena Trading Post Museum

My sculptures and two of James Ayers’ paintings in the historic Toadlena Trading Post Museum.

My sculptures and two of James Ayers’ paintings in the historic Toadlena Trading Post Museum.

 

Wopila Artist Guild’s mission is to give back to Native American communities by supporting youth art education.

For this show, James and I each created three works of art that reflect traditional Navajo weaving life—a lifestyle that has remained intact for hundreds of years. Twenty percent of the sale of these works will be donated to the Toadlena Young Weavers Project, a non-profit fund administered by the Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian in Santa Fe.

But, to be honest, with the warm welcome and kind hearts of everyone involved in this show, James and I feel like we were the recipients of something special!

 

Toadlena Boyz

James Ayers and and I in our “Toadlena Boyz” apparel in front of our exhibit in the museum at the historic Toadlena Trading Post. Toadlena Boyz are volunteers who help tote drinks and plates of food to the elders at parties so the seniors do not have to stand in line.

Presenting sculpture depicting the traditional Navajo weaving life

I’m pleased to present the museum collection. These works are available for sale now.

(A complete list of art featured in the show can be found on the Wopila available art page.)

The Chaperone

The Chaperone, features a Navajo woman tending to the young sheep of her flock.

The shepherdess is wearing the traditional blanket dress and bun hairstyle of 150 years ago.

The Chaperone

The Chaperone
32″H x 14″W x 14″D
Bronze
$7,000

The Lesson

The Lesson depicts two Navajo women of yesteryear carding and spinning wool.

James Ayers and I learned about Navajo carding and spinning techniques during our 2010 research trip to the historic Toadlena Trading Post on the occasion of their annual carding and spinning day.

Under the patient tutelage of Master Weavers, James Ayers and I tried our hands at traditional Navajo carding and spinning (with mixed results).

Having had done all that hands-on research really allowed me bring these two characters to life

The Lesson

The Lesson by Craig Bergsgaard
Finished size with base will be 20″ t x 24″w x 16″ d
$6,000

Saving the Day

In Saving the Day, a Navajo man tenderly cares for a small lamb in his flock.

 

Saving the Day

Saving the Day by Craig Bergsgaard
Approx. 30″ tall
Bronze
$6,000

Special bonus for purchaser of #1 of each edition

The #1 version of each of these pieces will have three special features that the other pieces in the edition will not have:

  1. A miniature Navajo rug (approx 6″ x 18″) with the title of the piece handwoven into it
  2. A special walnut “jewelry box” style base with a drawer that can house the tiny rug, the catalog, and photos of the piece with the weavers (and other show ephemera)
  3. The title is laser cut into the jewelry box and highlighted with gold pigment

Interested in purchasing one of these works? Then you can help our mission to support Native American youth art education.

If you would like us to purchase one of these works, please contact my studio by email here: Craig Bergsgaard Studio or call me at 720-312-4498.

A special thank you to all who made this museum show great

I thank trading post proprietors Mark and Linda Winter for including the exhibit during their big, bi-annual community event (which was also their wedding day!).

The wedding of Mark and Linda Winter, proprietors of the historic Toadlena Trading Post.

The wedding of Mark and Linda Winter, proprietors of the historic Toadlena Trading Post.

I would also like to thank the masterful artisans of the Toadlena Trading Post. Their dedication and skill are truly inspiring.

And of course, I would like to thank the benefactors and lovers of fine art. It is only through your support that Wopila can continue to pursue its goal of funding Native American youth art education.

To learn more about Wopila Artist Guild and the Honoring the Weaver’s show, please see the article from Western Art Collector Magazine.